rhinoplasty header



Information about this procedure is listed under the following headings:


Why do I need this operation?

What are the intended benefits of the surgery?

How is the surgery performed?

What are the potential risks and how great are these risks?

What am I to expect after the operation?

How long will I be off work/school?

Frequently asked Questions





Why do I need this operation?

A rhinoplasty is performed to alter the external appearance of the nose. The non-medical term for this procedure is a 'nose-job'. If the inside of the nose also has an abnormal shape, this operation may be combined with a septoplasty. The combination is known as a septorhinoplasty.(please click here for information on the septoplasty part of the septorhinoplasty)



What are the intended benefits of the surgery?

The surgery is intended to improve the outward or cosmetic appearance of the nose. If the inside of the nose is also being changed, the aim will be to reduce blockage of the nose.



How is the surgery performed?

The attachments of the nasal bones (see picture)are disconnected through tiny cuts in the skin. These are so small they do not leave scars. A small cut is made inside the nose in both nostrils and instruments are passed up to trim the cartilage and bone of the nose. Once the nose has been altered to the required position, it is splinted with a plaster of paris splint. Nasal packs are sometimes used.



What are the potential risks?

Please click here for the complications of the septoplasty part of the operation. The rhinoplasty inself has few complications.



What am I to expect after the operation?

It is likely that there will be bruising around the nose. You may develop 'black eyes' as well. You will experience some pain, but this is not normally very severe. Your splint willl stay on for two weeks.



How long will I be off work / school?

Two weeks off is required. A doctor's note will be provided.



Frequently asked Questions

Will there be any scars?

No. The only cut made in the skin are less than three millimetres and do not produce visible scars.

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Last updated: 23 October 2004